Courses

Fall 2017

Introduction to Macroeconomics
The theory of the determination of the level of national income and economic activity, including an examination of the financial system. Emphasis on economic growth and such economic problems as inflation, unemployment and recession, and on appropriate policy responses. Some attention is also paid to international issues.
Instructors: Elizabeth Chapin Bogan
Introduction to Microeconomics
Economics is the study of how people and societies deal with scarcity. This course focuses on the advantages and disadvantages of market systems for allocating scarce resources.
Instructors: Henry Stuart Farber
Labor Economics/Industrial Relations Seminar
Drafts of papers, articles, and chapters of dissertations or books, prepared by graduate students, faculty members, or visiting scholars, are exposed to critical analysis by a series of seminars organized by field. The chief objectives are for the writers to receive the benefit of critical suggestions, for all participants to gain experience in criticism and uninhibited oral discussion, and for students and faculty members to become acquainted with the research work going on in the department. Third- and fourth-year graduate students are expected to attend; first-and second-year students and faculty members are invited to attend.
Law and Economics
An introduction to the economics of law. Application of price theory and welfare analysis to problems and actual cases in the common law - property, contracts, torts - and to criminal and constitutional law. Topics include the Coase Theorem, intellectual property, inalienable goods, product liability, crime and punishment, and social choice theory.
Instructors: Thomas Clark Leonard
Macroeconomic Theory I
First term of a two-term sequence in macroeconomics. Topics include consumption, saving, and investment; real interest rates and asset prices; long-term economic growth; money and inflation; and econometric methods for macroeconomics.
Macroeconomics/International Finance Workshop
Drafts of papers, articles, and chapters of dissertations or books, prepared by graduate students, faculty members, or visiting scholars, are exposed to critical analysis by a series of seminars organized by field. The chief objectives are for the writers to receive the benefit of critical suggestions, for all participants to gain experience in criticism and uninhibited oral discussion, and for students and faculty members to become acquainted with the research work going on in the department. Third- and fourth-year graduate students are expected to attend; first-and second-year students and faculty members are invited to attend.
Microeconomic Theory
This is an intermediate microeconomics course. The general themes are: (1) choices made by individual consumers and firms, (2) equilibrium of the interaction of these choices in markets and (3) the role of government policy in improving economic outcomes. Some new concepts and techniques are developed, especially for studying behavior under uncertainty, and strategic interactions (game theory). The theory of each topic is accompanied by evidence, illustrations, and applications.
Microeconomic Theory I
First term of a two-term sequence in microeconomic theory. Topics include consumer and producer theory, choice under uncertainty and an introduction to game theory.
Microeconomic Theory: A Mathematical Approach
This course presents the economic theory of individual and firm behavior using mathematical tools including calculus. The course will emphasize applications of microeconomic theory to consumer choices, output and production of firms, market interaction and equilibrium.
Microeconomics Theory Workshop
Drafts of papers, articles, and chapters of dissertations or books, prepared by graduate students, faculty members, or visiting scholars, are exposed to critical analysis by a series of seminars organized by field. The chief objectives are for the writers to receive the benefit of critical suggestions, for all participants to gain experience in criticism and uninhibited oral discussion, and for students and faculty members to become acquainted with the research work going on in the department. Third- and fourth-year graduate students are expected to attend; first-and second-year students and faculty members are invited to attend.

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Undergraduate Courses

Advanced Economic Theory I
Advanced Macroeconomic Theory I
Asset Pricing
Behavioral Economics Workshop
Chinese Financial and Monetary Systems