Courses

Below are courses at Princeton University that focus on contemporary China issues.

Fall 2017-18

China's Frontiers (HIS 439 / EAS 439)
Janet Y. Chen
Fall 2017-18

This seminar will examine how the territorial footprint of the People's Republic of China was created, by exploring the history of its frontier regions. Through units on Tibet, Xinjiang, Taiwan, Manchuria, and the Southwest, we will interrogate concepts of ethnic identity, nationalism, culture, and religion, as well as contested historical claims over territory and sovereignty. Some basic knowledge of modern Chinese history is helpful but not required.

Chinese Financial and Monetary Systems (ECO 494 / FIN 494)
Guifeng Sun and Wei Xiong
Fall 2017-18

With its rapid economic growth in the past three decades, China already has the world's second largest economy. Meanwhile its financial markets are also being quickly liberalized and integrated with the rest of the world. As the current trend continues, there are growing interests to learn and understand the workings of China's financial and monetary systems. This course aims to serve this objective with a particular emphasis on understanding the role provided by the financial system in facilitating China's economic development, in addition to the investment opportunities and risk presented by the system to the outside world.

Chinese Intellectual History (EAS 507)
Willard J. Peterson
Fall 2017-18

This course focuses on methods, sources, and problems of research in history of Chinese thought.

Fall 2016-17

China's Frontiers (HIS 439 / EAS 439)
Janet Y. Chen
Fall 2016-17

This seminar will investigate the historical roots of contemporary conflicts over territory and sovereignty in China's frontier areas. Focusing on Tibet, Xinjiang, and Taiwan, we will explore how history has been, and continues to be, used to explain or justify geopolitical goals and realities. The north and northeast (Inner Mongolia, Manchuria) and the southwest borderlands will provide points of comparison, to understand how issues such as religion, gender, ethnicity, and nationalism matter in different historical contexts.

Chinese Financial and Monetary Systems (ECO 494 / FIN 594)
Yaxin Duan and Wei Xiong
Fall 2016-17

With its rapid economic growth in the past three decades, China already has the world's second largest economy. Meanwhile its financial markets are also being quickly liberalized and integrated with the rest of the world. As the current trend continues, there are growing interests to learn and understand the workings of China's financial and monetary systems. This course aims to serve this objective with a particular emphasis on understanding the role provided by the financial system in facilitating China's economic development, in addition to the investment opportunities and risk presented by the system to the outside world.

Contemporary East Asia (EAS 229)
David Leheny
Fall 2016-17

This course is an introduction to the societies, cultures, and politics of contemporary East Asia. The rise of East Asia has inspired Western observers to reflect on the ways in which capitalism, democracy, and modern social relationships can unfold in different ways. It has also prompted debates about the development of political systems, about the most efficient and just ways to organize economic growth, and even about what constitutes Asia. Although the course will focus especially on China, Japan, South Korea, and Vietnam, we will draw special attention to issues that cut across national boundaries.

Elementary Chinese I (CHI 101)
Jianfei Chen, Ning Liu, Xiang Lv, Ding Wang-Bramlett, Xin Zou
Fall 2016-17

An intensive introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese, stressing oral-aural facility and the analysis of structure.

Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I (CHI 403)
Jianfei Chen and Xiang Lv
Fall 2016-17

Reading and discussion of selections from Chinese and newspapers on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues.

Intensive Elementary Chinese (CHI 103)
Luanfeng Huang, Tao Peng, Tingting Wang
Fall 2016-17

Designed for students who already have some familiarity with spoken Mandarin. The course will emphasize reading and writing skills. Students who speak Mandarin with non-standard accents will be trained in standard pronunciation.

Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I (CHI 405)
Qifan Ding and Shutan Dong
Fall 2016-17

Reading and discussion based on Chinese scholarly journals, popular essays, and newspaper articles. Students are exposed to a variety of modern Chinese literary genres, as well as some of the major substantive issues that modern Chinese intellectuals have faced.

Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese I (CHI 305)
Tingting Wang and Ding Wang-Bramlett
Fall 2016-17

Designed to further develop student's overall language skills through readings and discussion of contemporary affairs published in Chinese newspapers.

Intermediate Chinese I (CHI 105)
Qifan Ding, Shutan Dong, Wei Gong
Fall 2016-17

While reinforcing the knowledge students have acquired thus far, this course will further develop the students' audio-lingual proficiency as well as bring their reading and writing ability to a higher level.

Introduction to Classical Chinese I (CHI 301)
Chih-p'ing Chou, Xin Zou 
Fall 2016-17

CHI 301 not only provides basic training for students in classical Chinese, but also introduces students to theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as the concept of Dao, life and death, etc. Each theme is consisted of passages selected from Chinese classics and short essays or stories full of wisdom and wit from later dynasties. This course will not only improve your four skills in Chinese language but also enhance your understanding of traditional Chinese philosophy and culture in general.

Third Year Modern Chinese I (CHI 303)
Wei Gong, Luanfeng Huang, Jing Xie
Fall 2016-17

Designed to further develop the student's overall language skills through reading and discussion of contemporary affairs published in Chinese newspapers.

Spring 2016-17

Asian Capital Markets (ECO 492)
Jean-Christophe de Swaan 
Spring 2016-17

Course explores the increasing weight of Asia in global financial markets and its implications. It frames the discussion in the context of the globalization of financial markets, with emphasis on concepts of economic development, institutional reform of markets, and public and private market investments. Discussions and investment case studies will combine analysis of historical trends and recent data with insights from practical experience in Asian markets. Course considers China's gradual shift toward a capital market-based financial system, the potential revival of Japanese capital markets, and the development of Indian capital markets.

China, 1850 to the Present (HIS 325 / EAS 355)
Janet Y. Chen 
Spring 2016-17

This course is an introduction to the history of modern China, from imperial dynasty to Republic, from the Red Guards to red capitalists. Through primary sources in translation, we will explore political and social revolutions, transformations in intellectual life and culture, as well as competing explanations for events such as the rise of the Communist Party and the Cultural Revolution. Major themes include: the impact of imperialism and war, tensions between governance and dissent, the emergence of nationalism, and the significance of China's history for its present and future.

China's Foreign Relations (WWS 316 / POL 399 / WWS 556A)
Thomas J. Christensen 
Spring 2016-17

This course will review and analyze the foreign policy of the People's Republic of China from 1949 to the present. It will examine Beijing's relations with the Soviet Union, the United States, Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, and the developing world during the Cold War. It will explore the impact on China's foreign relations of changes in the Chinese economy since the reform era began in 1978, the domestic legitimacy challenges in Beijing since the Tiananmen protests of 1989, and the continuing rise of Chinese power and influence in Asia and beyond since the end of the Cold War.

Chinese Martial Arts Classics: Fiction, Film, Fact (EAS 231)
Pieter C. Keulemans 
Spring 2016-17

This course provides an overview of Chinese martial arts fiction and film from earliest times to the present day. The focus will be on the close-reading of literary, art-historical, and cinematic texts, but will also include discussion of the significance of these works against their broader historical and social background. Topics to be discussed: the literary/cinematic pleasure of watching violence, the relationship between violence and the law, gender ambiguity and the woman warrior, the imperial and (trans)national order of martial arts cinema, and the moral and physical economy of vengeance.

Contemporary China (SOC 307)
Yu Xie
Spring 2016-17

This course provides an overview of contemporary Chinese society. Chinese society is best understood through a number of different intrinsically-linked and mutually-interdependent aspects. For this reason, we will explore its history, cultural practices, government, economy, and family structure.

Elementary Chinese II (CHI 102)
Jianfei Chen, Ning Liu, Xiang Lv, Ding Wang-Bramlett, Xin Zou 
Spring 2016-17

Continuation of Chinese 101. To develop basic competence in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Mandarin Chinese.

Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I (CHI 403)
Ding Wang-Bramlett, Yongtao Zhang
Spring 2016-17

Reading and discussion of selections from Chinese scholarly journals and newspapers on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues.

Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II (CHI 404)
Jianfei Chen, Xiang Lv
Spring 2016-17

A continuation of 403. Reading and discussion of scholarly writings in the fields of Chinese literature and modern Chinese intellectual history.

Intensive Elementary Chinese (CHI 103)
Tao Peng, Ding Wang-Bramlett, Jinhui Zhen 
Spring 2016-17

Designed for students who already have some familiarity with spoken Mandarin. The course will emphasize reading and writing skills, and how to analyze grammar. Students who speak Mandarin with non-standard accents will be trained in standard pronunciation.

Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I (CHI 405)
Jianfei Chen, Yunjun Zhou <
Spring 2016-17

Reading and discussion based on Chinese scholarly journals, popular essays, and newspaper articles. Students are exposed to a variety of modern Chinese literary genres, as well as some of the major substantive issues that modern Chinese intellectuals have faced.

Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II (CHI 406)
Qifan Ding, Shutan Dong
Spring 2016-17

Continued reading and discussion of scholarly writings on modern Chinese literature. This course also exposes students to the social issues China has faced in recent years, while discussing various aspects of contemporary Chinese society.

Intensive Intermediate Chinese (CHI 108)
Luanfeng Huang, Tao Peng, Tingting Wang 
Spring 2016-17

An intensive course covering 105 and 107 in one semester for students who have finished 103 which covers 101 and 102. The course will emphasize reading and writing skills and the analysis of grammar. After 108, students are ready for third year courses.

Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese I (CHI 305)
Shutan Dong and Jinhui Zhen 
Spring 2016-17

Designed for students who are interested in current political and social issues in Chinese affairs. Reading materials will be selected from newspapers of the People's Republic of China.

Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese II (CHI 306)
Tingting Wang, Ding Wang-Bramlett
Spring 2016-17

A continuation of 305, designed to further improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of essays published in contemporary Chinese newspapers and magazines.

Intermediate Chinese I (CHI 105)
Jianfei Chen, Lei Guo, Yongtao Zhang, Yunjun Zhou 
Spring 2016-17

While reinforcing the knowledge students have acquired thus far, this course will further develop the students' audio-lingual proficiency as well as bring their reading and writing ability to a higher level.

Intermediate Chinese II (CHI 107)
Qifan Ding, Shutan Dong, Wei Gong 
Spring 2016-17

Continuing the intensive study of modern spoken and written Chinese, this course shifts the emphasis to the reading of modern cultural and social issues.

Introduction to Classical Chinese II (CHI 302)
Chih-p'ing Chou, Xin Zou 
Spring 2016-17

The purpose of this course is, first and foremost, to introduce and master the fundamental grammar of classical Chinese and to read short, original texts, from different periods and genres. It also provides theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as conceptions of life and death, filial piety, warfare, conflicts between marriage and romance, and the development of ideas of utopia. Questions such as these were at the heart of Chinese intellectual debates.

Modern Chinese Literature and Film (EAS 334)
Pieter C. Keulemans 
Spring 2016-17

An introduction to the major literary and cinematic texts of modern China. Emphasis will be on the close reading/viewing of these works, but discussion will also include the socio-historical context in which these works were produced and consumed. Issues to be discussed include the relationship between city and countryside, issues of femininity and masculinity, revolution as political and aesthetic act, and the global circulation of Chinese literature and film.

The Chinese Economy (ECO 379 / EAS 346)
Gregory C. Chow 
Spring 2016-17

Institutional, theoretical and quantitative study of the Chinese economy. Topics include historical background, period of planning and political movements, economic reform, economic growth and fluctuations, macro economic policy, consumption, regional disparity, population, human capital, banking and financial system, state enterprise restructuring, foreign trade and investment, the legal system, science and education, environmental problems and policy, and the functioning and characteristics of the Chinese economy in general.

Third-Year Modern Chinese I (CHI 303)
Joanne Y. Chiang, Lei Guo, Jincheng Liu 
Spring 2016-17

Designed to further develop the student's overall language skills through reading and discussion of contemporary affairs published in Chinese newspapers.

Third-Year Modern Chinese II (CHI 304)
Wei Gong, Luanfeng Huang, Jing Xie 
Spring 2016-17

A continuation of CHI 303, designed to improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of newspaper essays and commentaries.